About your Search

20121101
20121130
SHOW
STATION
KQED (PBS) 40
KRCB (PBS) 33
KQEH (PBS) 21
WETA 10
WMPT (PBS) 9
LANGUAGE
English 113
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 113 (some duplicates have been removed)
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: talk of a truce in the middle east was on, off, and then up in the air, even as secretary of state hillary clinton arrived in jerusalem on a mission to end the week-old conflict. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the prospects for a cease-fire and the bargaining positions on both sides. >> brown: then, two weeks after the vote, a florida congressional race is resolved. we update the post-election changes in the house of representatives. >> woodruff: would building walls protect cities like new york from flooding after major storms? hari sreenivasan examines that as part of our "coping with climate change" series. >> as people continue to clean up from hurricane sandy, we look at what it could take to keep this damage from happening again. >> brown: ray suarez updates the health care reform law, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school f
. >> brown: we have two stories about continuing unrest in the middle east, beginning with the political crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: israel stepped up its military offensive in gaza today and hamas rockets targeted tel aviv in day two of a growing middle east conflict. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the war which has claimed civilian deaths on both sides. >> brown: then, b.p. admits to felony charges and agrees to pay the largest single criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communi party andhe military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who h
brown: new details emerge about the affair that led to the resignation of c.i.a. director david petraeus and about when the f.b.i. first uncover evidence of it. good evening. i'm geoffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight we get the latest on the time line as we know it and the implications for the intelligence agecy. >> brown: then gay rights add voaks won their first victory at the ballot box last week. ray suarez examines the significance of voters in three states approving same-sex marriage. of >> when they see us on their front doorstep >> ifill: special correspondent john tulenko tells the story of teachers coming to the rescue of families in storm-ravaged new jersey. knocking and they realize it's us and we're here to see if they're okay, their faces lit up. >> brown: and we have three reports about veterans, beginning with a pro publica investigation into lost or destroyed combat records. >> ifill: then we talk with a veteran who has written about how we choose to remember those who serve. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with first-t
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: large parts of new jersey were in ruins today, as it became clear the state bore the brunt of the storm from its coastline to the new york suburbs. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on rescue and recovery efforts in the northeast. plus, hari sreenivasan reports from lower manhattan where shuttered businesses are facing mounting losses. >> brown: then, after a pause from the storm. it was game back-on for the presidential candidates with five days to go before election day. we get an update. >> we know what change looks like. and what the governor's offering sure ain't change. >> we need a president who understands business, and i do. that's why i will be able to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challengin
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: police and protesters clashed in cairo's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we
and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern dance to contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to conference, playing a game of musical chairs where the end goal is more money from lucrative tv contracts. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connect
standstill. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it. >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup efforts in the northeast. ray suarez updates the slow climb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's war. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa's population, their numbers have increased by 110% over the last ten years. >> brown: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama said today he believes a framework for a debt-cutting deal can be reached in the coming weeks. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the efforts to resolve the impasse over tax hikes and spending cuts. >> brown: then, we get two views of a palestinian bid for limited statehood, ahead of a key vote tomorrow at the united nations. >> warner: wonder why your bills are going up? paul solman examines "the fine print" with author and journalist david cay johnston. >> i'm not against corporations. i am in favor of rules that make you earn your profits in the competitive market. you don't get them through a government rule that lets the company reach in your wallet and take money. the kinds of profits that we're >> brown: after the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama adm
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama was back at the white house today and congress returns to washington early next week. top on the agenda for both: a looming fiscal crisis. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we assess the task ahead in negotiations to avoid an economic hit from automatic spending cuts and tax increases. >> brown: then, we examine what's next for the republican party, after a second straight presidential campaign rebuke from a changing american electorate. >> woodruff: the associated press still hasn't called a winner in florida. why not? and why were the lines so long at some polling places across the country? ray suarez gets some answers. >> brown: john merrow tells the story of pediatricians with a new prescription: books to build better brains. >> there's solid research that shows that just that intervention of handing a family a book, giving them a couple of age-appropriate pieces of advice about how to read with their kid and just encouraging reading, they--
that forced c.i.a. director petraus to resign. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on what were termed "potentially inappropriate" e- mails and documents, and we examine if and when the white house and congress should have been alerted. >> ifill: then, the senate and the house of representatives get back to work. judy woodruff looks at the long list of challenges ahead. >> brown: one item on the agenda is the so-called fiscal cliff , and that was the focus of a white house meeting today with liberal leaders. we talk with two participants. >> ifill: plus, from "our food for nine billion" series, special correspondent mary kay magistad reports on china's moves to satisfy a growing demand for meat. it has transformed lives and diets over the past 30 years meat con suption per cap to has quadrupled and city dwellers eat twice as much meat on average as those in the countryside. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
examine the messages voters sent yesterday with jeffrey brown, who looks at the makeup of congress and the new laws around the country. >> woodruff: what to do about the fiscal cliff, healthcare and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >>
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 113 (some duplicates have been removed)